Categories
Destinations

Camping ban at Colorado state parks extended indefinitely

With Memorial Day less than three weeks away, the ban on camping in Colorado state parks that began six weeks ago has been extended until further notice by Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

CPW said the decision was based on Colorado’s Safer at Home guidelines, along with advice from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When it was announced on March 26, CPW said it would remain in effect until this week at least, and that it could be extended.

“We understand the strain these continued closures put on all of us, and we appreciate the public’s flexibility as we work through the process of reopening,” CPW director Dan Prenzlow said in a news release. “Our staff is working hard to make sure we can provide safe and enjoyable experiences for everyone.”

CPW is working with local and federal partners, along with CDPHE, to establish a timeline when camping with social distancing can resume. Complicating the process, each county has “unique circumstances,” the release said.

Reservations through May 11 have been canceled and full refunds will be given. Cancellation fees have been waved through the end of May. Campers with reservations can change them through the end of the year at no charge. For more information, visit cpwshop.com or call 800-244-5613.

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Travel

Occupancies at US Hotels Are at an All Time Low


With the COVID-19 pandemic effectively halting tourism around the world, hotels are facing a rough year with extraordinarily low occupancy rates. In the U.S. specifically, STR and Tourism Economics predict that RevPAR will drop 50.6 percent this year.

a close up of a person: Concierge service desk at a hotel

STR had originally expected occupancy to only drop 0.3 percent before the United States declared a nationwide emergency. Supply and demand had been expected to increase by 2 percent.

Now, according to Travel Weekly, occupancy is expected to fall by 42.6 percent to 37.9 percent while supply and demand may drop 14.9 percent and 51.2 percent, respectively.

GALLERY: 5 ways virtual travel can alleviate anxiety 

Slide 1 of 6: These are indeed crazy times as COVID-19 continues to shake the very foundation of our world. Travel as we know it is at a hiatus. Joyously anticipated vacations have been canceled, and even future trips are up in the air. There’s no doubt these are indeed uncertain and stressful times as many of us are now sheltering in place in order to ride out the pandemic. Yes, it’s a sacrifice, but also an opportunity. This too shall pass. Even the darkest days won’t last forever. Travel is a vital aspect of life that connects our past, present and future. It’s a continuum of our journey on this planet. And now, as travel is temporarily restricted, it is the perfect time to practice, employ and enjoy virtual travel to feed our souls. Here are some great ways to do that.
Slide 2 of 6: Networks like the Travel Channel feature a variety of documentaries, reality and practical shows related to travel around the United States and abroad. Additionally, there are a number of travel shows you can stream from home.  From African animal safaris and foodie adventures to ghost hunting, paranormal experiences and off-the-beaten-path journeys, these fascinating shows have always been an inspiration to travelers. They take us to destinations unknown and motivate us to reach out and discover new places. They not only encourage us to get out there and explore our big, beautiful world, but in these days of physical isolation, they provide the perfect escape. They are safe, but also fun, entertaining, ridiculous and sometimes off-the-wall. And with so many genres out there, everybody can find their favorites.
Slide 3 of 6: Reading a good book is like taking a journey. And today, it’s not even necessary to physically visit a bookstore, since we can order travel guide reference books and even fictional travel books online. The best part is that we can research the reviews, ratings and ‘look inside’ features before we hit that ‘buy’ button.  Amazon Prime members for example with a Kindle can read travel books for free. For those of us who still love to hold the written words in our hands, there’s a host of books to choose from. Readers can zero in on a city, country or region, journey through every continent on the globe or learn about the best U.S. road trips or how to discover the destinations of a lifetime.
Slide 4 of 6: There’s nothing better than believing that life will once again get back to normal, and it will. This includes travel. I don’t know how many times family and friends have said, “We need to sit down and plan that trip but we’re just so busy.” Well, now is the perfect time to do just that. Planning travel is a perfect distraction from all the mayhem around us. Instead of doing the same old, same old, this is a chance to regroup, rethink and re-evaluate. What are some of the places you’ve always wanted to visit? Life is a gift, and the world is a treasure trove filled with exotic places, fascinating cultures and unexperienced delights. Forget those routine trips to familiar destinations. Now it’s time to up your game. If you’ve been dreaming of that trip of a lifetime, this is your opportunity to start looking and planning for it. If nothing else, it provides travelers a sense of hope and a way to exert some control in a world filled with chaos and uncertainty. And when things settle down, it will be your time to make that dream trip a reality.

Slide 5 of 6: Rather than the typical recent travel posts we’re used to seeing daily on social media sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, this is the perfect time to highlight destinations that we as travelers have loved and memories we’ve cherished. Sharing not only makes us feel good re-living those moments, but it is also a source of inspiration to others who may not have had those experiences or traveled to that destination. Those posts may, in turn, inspire us.
Slide 6 of 6: Nothing relieves anxiety and promotes family bonding like playing a game together. There are hosts of travel trivia games on the market (and perhaps even some already in your closet) that can entertain and inspire homebound adventures. For the little ones, Candy Land is a great example of fantasy travel. Ticket to Ride provides amazing cross-country train adventures across the vast divides of a host of nations and continents. It’s also a geographic learning experience while sowing the seeds for future travel destinations. Just last year, while playing the game, our grandchildren selected Paris as their next wish-list destination. Ancient philosopher Rumi once said, “Travel brings power and love back to your life.” In these anxious times, it’s important to tap into any of the powers that we can. So, ask yourself this: Where am I headed once the COVID-19 crisis is over?

Stressful Times

These are indeed crazy times as COVID-19 continues to shake the very foundation of our world.

Travel as we know it is at a hiatus. Joyously anticipated vacations have been canceled, and even future trips are up in the air. There’s no doubt these are indeed uncertain and stressful times as many of us are now sheltering in place in order to ride out the pandemic. Yes, it’s a sacrifice, but also an opportunity.

This too shall pass. Even the darkest days won’t last forever. Travel is a vital aspect of life that connects our past, present and future. It’s a continuum of our journey on this planet. And now, as travel is temporarily restricted, it is the perfect time to practice, employ and enjoy virtual travel to feed our souls.

Here are some great ways to do that.

Watch Travel Shows

Networks like the Travel Channel feature a variety of documentaries, reality and practical shows related to travel around the United States and abroad. Additionally, there are a number of travel shows you can stream from home. 

From African animal safaris and foodie adventures to ghost hunting, paranormal experiences and off-the-beaten-path journeys, these fascinating shows have always been an inspiration to travelers. They take us to destinations unknown and motivate us to reach out and discover new places.

They not only encourage us to get out there and explore our big, beautiful world, but in these days of physical isolation, they provide the perfect escape. They are safe, but also fun, entertaining, ridiculous and sometimes off-the-wall. And with so many genres out there, everybody can find their favorites.

Order Travel Books

Reading a good book is like taking a journey. And today, it’s not even necessary to physically visit a bookstore, since we can order travel guide reference books and even fictional travel books online. The best part is that we can research the reviews, ratings and ‘look inside’ features before we hit that ‘buy’ button. 

Amazon Prime members for example with a Kindle can read travel books for free. For those of us who still love to hold the written words in our hands, there’s a host of books to choose from. Readers can zero in on a city, country or region, journey through every continent on the globe or learn about the best U.S. road trips or how to discover the destinations of a lifetime.

Plan Future Travel

There’s nothing better than believing that life will once again get back to normal, and it will. This includes travel. I don’t know how many times family and friends have said, “We need to sit down and plan that trip but we’re just so busy.”

Well, now is the perfect time to do just that. Planning travel is a perfect distraction from all the mayhem around us. Instead of doing the same old, same old, this is a chance to regroup, rethink and re-evaluate. What are some of the places you’ve always wanted to visit?

Life is a gift, and the world is a treasure trove filled with exotic places, fascinating cultures and unexperienced delights. Forget those routine trips to familiar destinations. Now it’s time to up your game.

If you’ve been dreaming of that trip of a lifetime, this is your opportunity to start looking and planning for it. If nothing else, it provides travelers a sense of hope and a way to exert some control in a world filled with chaos and uncertainty. And when things settle down, it will be your time to make that dream trip a reality.

Share Favorite Travel Memories on Social Media

Rather than the typical recent travel posts we’re used to seeing daily on social media sites like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, this is the perfect time to highlight destinations that we as travelers have loved and memories we’ve cherished.

Sharing not only makes us feel good re-living those moments, but it is also a source of inspiration to others who may not have had those experiences or traveled to that destination. Those posts may, in turn, inspire us.

Play Travel Games

Nothing relieves anxiety and promotes family bonding like playing a game together. There are hosts of travel trivia games on the market (and perhaps even some already in your closet) that can entertain and inspire homebound adventures.

For the little ones, Candy Land is a great example of fantasy travel. Ticket to Ride provides amazing cross-country train adventures across the vast divides of a host of nations and continents. It’s also a geographic learning experience while sowing the seeds for future travel destinations. Just last year, while playing the game, our grandchildren selected Paris as their next wish-list destination.

Ancient philosopher Rumi once said, “Travel brings power and love back to your life.”

In these anxious times, it’s important to tap into any of the powers that we can. So, ask yourself this: Where am I headed once the COVID-19 crisis is over?

“The industry was already set for a nongrowth year; now throw in this ultimate ‘black swan’ event, and we’re set to see occupancy drop to an unprecedented low,” said Jan Freitag, STR’s senior vice president of lodging insights. “Our historical database extends back to 1987, and the worst we have ever seen for absolute occupancy was 54.6% during the financial crisis in 2009.”

While STR saw the steepest U.S. RevPAR decline in 30 years the week of March 21, Tourism Economics remains optimistic that the hotel industry will see a quick rebound once the pandemic is over. The president of Tourism Economics, Adam Sacks, predicts “the market to begin to regain its footing this summer.”

STR and Tourism Economics expect that U.S. hotel RevPAR will increase 63.1 percent in 2021, with occupancy increasing 57.3 percent to 59.7 percent and supply and demand increasing by 15.6 percent and 81.8 percent respectively.

WATCH: Health care system preps for using stadiums, hotels (provided by CBS Minnesota)


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    A 60-second virtual vacation in the Bahamas
    Find out why this stunning archipelago is a diver's paradise.

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    Man documents ‘eerie’ journey from Chicago to Las Vegas
    The United State’s 3rd busiest airport was empty and sin city a ghost town. Veuer’s Tony Spitz has the details.

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    How to decide if you’ll be traveling this summer
    A lot of people are re-evaluating their summer travel plans. Veuer’s Natasha Abellard has the story.

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Destinations

Seeing Bangkok in new light at Hyatt Regency

There are few skylines more compelling than Bangkok’s. As seen from above, the Chao Phraya river snakes through a sea of ancient temples and towering steel. At sundown, the sky fades to a bluish gray as the cityscape begins its steady nighttime transformation from flickering twinkles to a full-on grid of neon. To see Bangkok from its rooftops is an unforgettable experience, and a recently opened hotel is bringing it alive with a fresh perspective.

In December 2018, the Hyatt Regency Bangkok Sukhumvit opened its doors, marking the Hyatt Regency brand’s entry into the capital of Thailand. The luxe hotel embodies many of the buzzwords that make Bangkok so iconic: high-tech, traditional, a touch of audacity.

The hotel sits on one of the city’s most well-known thoroughfares, near the Nana neighborhood, the veritable red-light district of Bangkok. 

The nod to the traditional is matched only by the 21st-century touches that bring this hotel to the forefront of modern design. 

The 31-story, mixed-use development (it also includes condos and retail shopping) was conceived as a modern Thai house, and each detail is a nod to Thai history as told through decorative pieces of art, furniture and rugs. Walls and tucked-away corners pop with elegant sculptures designed by local artist Ajarn Nontiwat Jantanapalin.

The hotel features 273 guestrooms, including 21 suites. Each room has floor-to-ceiling windows that give a sweeping, clean line over the city. Rooms start at 377 square feet, and each one is equipped with the Hyatt Mobile Entry technology, which means that a guest can use a smartphone to open their room.

In addition, each room has a Handy smartphone that allows guests to stay connected while exploring the city. Guests on the 27th floor have access to the Regency Club Lounge, which includes privileges like private check-in and checkout as well as complimentary food and beverages with city views.

One of the highlights of the Hyatt Regency Bangkok Sukhumvit can be found perched on the top three floors of the hotel. Spectrum Lounge & Bar has positioned itself as a prime gathering spot for guests, business travelers and upscale residents looking to see and be seen with a cocktail in hand and the intensity of an illuminated Bangkok by night.

The lounge experience serves choice cuts of grilled meats, seafood, craft cocktails and whiskey, with live music permeating the three-story space, which opens to an open-air rooftop.

There are two other dining outlets, including a lobby lounge bar and Market Cafe, which serves authentic Thai cuisine.

For a different city view, this time during the day, step out onto the sixth-floor terrace for an outdoor, free-form swimming pool tucked amid a lush garden. Other amenities of this outdoor playground include a whirlpool, pool bar, steam room and a 24-hour gym.

To ease city exploration, the hotel is located with direct access to the BTS Skytrain Nana Station. It is within a short trip to the National Museum, Asiatique Riverfront, EmQuartier shopping and the Grand Palace and Emerald Buddha.

Rates begin at $155.

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Categories
Destinations

Seeing Bangkok in new light at Hyatt Regency

There are few skylines more compelling than Bangkok’s. As seen from above, the Chao Phraya river snakes through a sea of ancient temples and towering steel. At sundown, the sky fades to a bluish gray as the cityscape begins its steady nighttime transformation from flickering twinkles to a full-on grid of neon. To see Bangkok from its rooftops is an unforgettable experience, and a recently opened hotel is bringing it alive with a fresh perspective.

In December 2018, the Hyatt Regency Bangkok Sukhumvit opened its doors, marking the Hyatt Regency brand’s entry into the capital of Thailand. The luxe hotel embodies many of the buzzwords that make Bangkok so iconic: high-tech, traditional, a touch of audacity.

The hotel sits on one of the city’s most well-known thoroughfares, near the Nana neighborhood, the veritable red-light district of Bangkok. 

The nod to the traditional is matched only by the 21st-century touches that bring this hotel to the forefront of modern design. 

The 31-story, mixed-use development (it also includes condos and retail shopping) was conceived as a modern Thai house, and each detail is a nod to Thai history as told through decorative pieces of art, furniture and rugs. Walls and tucked-away corners pop with elegant sculptures designed by local artist Ajarn Nontiwat Jantanapalin.

The hotel features 273 guestrooms, including 21 suites. Each room has floor-to-ceiling windows that give a sweeping, clean line over the city. Rooms start at 377 square feet, and each one is equipped with the Hyatt Mobile Entry technology, which means that a guest can use a smartphone to open their room.

In addition, each room has a Handy smartphone that allows guests to stay connected while exploring the city. Guests on the 27th floor have access to the Regency Club Lounge, which includes privileges like private check-in and checkout as well as complimentary food and beverages with city views.

One of the highlights of the Hyatt Regency Bangkok Sukhumvit can be found perched on the top three floors of the hotel. Spectrum Lounge & Bar has positioned itself as a prime gathering spot for guests, business travelers and upscale residents looking to see and be seen with a cocktail in hand and the intensity of an illuminated Bangkok by night.

The lounge experience serves choice cuts of grilled meats, seafood, craft cocktails and whiskey, with live music permeating the three-story space, which opens to an open-air rooftop.

There are two other dining outlets, including a lobby lounge bar and Market Cafe, which serves authentic Thai cuisine.

For a different city view, this time during the day, step out onto the sixth-floor terrace for an outdoor, free-form swimming pool tucked amid a lush garden. Other amenities of this outdoor playground include a whirlpool, pool bar, steam room and a 24-hour gym.

To ease city exploration, the hotel is located with direct access to the BTS Skytrain Nana Station. It is within a short trip to the National Museum, Asiatique Riverfront, EmQuartier shopping and the Grand Palace and Emerald Buddha.

Rates begin at $155.

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Categories
Travel

The Himalayas at its fantasy movie best…

Incredible images taken by an intrepid explorer show the ‘fantasy movie’ landscape of one of the Himalayas’ most remote regions

  • Darius Radkevicius visited Upper Mustang, a semi-autonomous part of Nepal that opened to tourists in 1992
  • He trekked across its mesmerising landscape with a team of five, including a guide, chef and 10 mules
  • The locals live in brutal conditions, with piped water turning to ice at night and dried manure burned for heat 

The ‘fantasy movie’ landscape of one of the most isolated and remote regions in the Himalayas has been revealed in a series of incredible pictures. 

They were taken by Lithuanian explorer Darius Radkevicius in Upper Mustang, a semi-autonomous region of Nepal that only opened to tourists in 1992.

While there he took part in a 28-day trek across the otherworldly landscape and discovered how the local population still live very much like their ancestors – cooking on dry manure and herding yaks – and in brutal conditions.

Lithuanian explorer Darius Radkevicius captured this incredible image at the foot of Dhaulagiri mountain during his trek across Upper Mustang. Dhaulagiri, at 8,167 metres (26,794ft), is the world’s seventh-highest mountain

The stunning Muktinath Village, a place which is sacred to both Hindus and Buddhists. It is home to one of the world’s highest temples, which lies at an altitude of 3,800m (12,467ft)

Darius found the perfect spot for meditating on day seven of the trek when he walked between Samar and Ghiling 

Darius said: ‘The people are fantastic and welcoming. Though it seems that they still live the same life their ancestors used to live – herding animals, farming and little trade.’ Pictured is the landscape on the way to Dhakmar 

Some of the houses in the settlement of Kagbeni. It is a popular stop-off for people trekking through Upper Mustang 

The Ghar Gompa monastery, pictured, dates back to the 8th century and is thought to be the oldest in the Mustang region

An aerial shot of Lo Manthang in Upper Mustang. It has a population of around 876 people 

One of the colourful buildings in Lo Manthang. The town is known for its tall, whitewashed mud-brick walls 

The view that greeted Darius in Kagbeni after the first leg of the trek. It has a population of around 1,200 people 

His trip took place last November and he explored the area with a team of five – a guide called Karma and his assistant, a chef and his assistant, and a mule handler who wrangled 10 mules and one horse.

One of the first things Darius noticed about trekking in Upper Mustang was the extreme conditions.

He told MailOnline Travel: ‘There is strong sunshine during the day at altitudes of about 2.5 miles (4km/13,200ft) but harsh ice-cold winds starting at 1pm.

‘The air in the icy peaks of the Himalayas cools and turns into harsh, rather cold and very strong winds.

While trekking to the village of Chhusang, Darius came across this former settlement, which had been carved out of the cliffs  

The ruins of an old fort at an elevation of 12,598ft (3,840m) that Darius passed on his way to Lo Manthang

The team’s mules are prepped before setting off for the journey between the villages of Kagbeni and Chhusang

On the seventh day of his trek, while walking from Samar to Ghiling, Darius came across this bone-like rock formation

Darius said: ‘There is daily changing beauty, never repeating views, polarising clouds and sun and moon together from midday.’ Pictured is Dhakmar 

The view that surrounds the Lori Cliff Monastery. Darius said: ‘There is strong sunshine during the day at altitudes of about 2.5 miles (4km/13,200ft) but harsh ice-cold winds starting at 1pm’ 

Barren trees stand against the red mountains in a stunning image that Darius captured in Dhakmar 

The Luri Cliff Monastery, which is perched on top of dramatic cliffs. Darius says it is a place where Indian and Tibetan art meet 

On his way to Dhakmar, Darius was told that this spot was said to be where Guru Rimpoche fought a dragon and spilt its blood 

This incredible picture of a red rock face was captured in the old town settlement in Dhakmar 

Darius was joined on his trip by a guide called Karma and his assistant, a chef and his assistant, and a mule handler who wrangled 10 mules and one horse

A view through one of the windows of the Lori Cliff Monastery out on to the rocky terrain below 

‘At dusk the air cools to minus temperatures and there is no heating in the local houses.

‘Burning wood isn’t really an option because trees stop growing at 5,000ft and bringing it up from the lowlands is very expensive. 

‘They cook on dried manure, which is picked by shepherds and yak herdsmen in the mountains. The water in the room freezes to ice at night, leaving no water in the toilet or tap until the sun rises.

‘The air is very dry with about 30 per cent moisture, which causes the nose to dry and become covered with bloody scabs.’

So life there is not easy. In the past though, it was far grander.

Upper Mustang is a semi-autonomous region of Nepal that only opened to tourists in 1992 

Darius said: ‘Mustang has beautiful mountains with winding paths. Each day the colours of the mountains are different – yellow, red, green and grey’ 

‘The Himalayas are unfriendly in nature and are a harsh environment for living, but they call you, you breathe differently there’, says Darius

Talking about the weather conditions in Upper Mustang, Darius said: ‘The air is very dry with about 30 per cent moisture, which causes the nose to dry and become covered with bloody scabs’

Darius added: ‘Maybe once when the Silk Road passed through people were rich. The past greatness of the region is now only visible in the ruins left around.

‘However, the people are fantastic and welcoming. Though it seems that they still live the same life their ancestors used to live – herding animals, farming and little trade.

‘You will maybe see one or two jeeps and a few satellite antennas.

‘However, if you are travelling in Mustang in late November you might miss the local population.

‘They might have migrated to the lowlands of Nepal as wintering in Mustang is nearly impossible.’

Despite the harsh environment, Darius says he is eager to return to Upper Mustang to gaze upon its stunning landscape once again.

A view out across Choser village from an old settlement carved into the cliff. It overlooks a makeshift football pitch

A cosmic-looking airfield close to the Luri Cliff monastery, which is at an elevation of 13,123ft (4,000m) 

This incredible rock formation was captured on camera by Darius on his way to the village of Dhakmar 

The village of Dhakmar, pictured, sits at an elevation of 12,523ft (3820m). Darius says that life in Upper Mustang ‘is not an easy one’ 

The trekking team get ready to start the first leg of their hike, which took them from Jomson to Kagbeni 

The ruins of a fortress near the Lori Cliff Monastery. Darius said: ‘The past greatness of the region is now only visible in the ruins left around’ 

On his way to Yara, Darius came across this ancient settlement, carved into the wall of a mountain 

He added: ‘The impression is that you are travelling in time or in some fantasy movie.

‘Mustang has beautiful mountains with winding paths. Each day the colours of the mountains are different – yellow, red, green and grey.

‘All in all, the Himalayas are a very mysterious place.

‘They are unfriendly in nature and are a harsh environment for living, but they call you, you breathe differently there, you get an understanding of how small you are and many secrets open up here.

‘There is daily changing beauty, never-repeating views, polarising clouds, sun and moon together from midday, heat and cold, flow and static and peace and danger.’ 

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Categories
Transport

Renovation work to resume at Denver airport

Construction on Denver Airport’s central terminal will
resume this week. 

The resumption comes seven months after the airport
terminated a $1.8 billion deal with previous contractor Great Hall. 

New contractor Hensel Phelps will begin the $195 million
Phase 1 of the resumed project. Primary portions of Phase 1 include demolition,
construction of new airline ticket counters and prep work for the installation
of new TSA checkpoints.

Phase 1 is expected to be completed late next year.

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Cruises

Caesars Raises Resort Fees at Four Las Vegas Hotels

Caesars Entertainment Corp. is the latest hospitality company to hike resort fees on the Las Vegas Strip.

According to the Reno Gazette-Journal, Caesars raised the nightly charges at Bally’s, Flamingo, The LINQ Hotel and Harrah’s Las Vegas from $35 to $37, or $41.95 after taxes.

A spokesperson for the company defended the decision, telling the outlet that the latest increase brings the company “in line with relevant competitors.”

MGM Resorts International and Wynn Resorts have also recently raised resort fees, which are charged on top of a guest’s base room rate. The mandatory charges pay for services such as free Wi-Fi and pool or gym access, among other things.

Tuesday’s move comes just months after Caesars hiked resort fees at Caesars Palace and Nobu Hotel Caesars Palace from $44.21 inclusive of tax to $51.02 per night and Rio All-Suites Hotel & Casino from $36.28 after taxes to $39.68 per night.

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